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The Oz Report https://OzReport.com/ <a href="https://OzReport.com/"><img src="https://OzReport.com/images/OzReportHeader774x179.jpg" width="100%" border="0"/></a><br /><b>The Oz Report Is...</b><br /> A near-daily, world wide hang gliding news ezine, with reports on competitions, pilot rankings, political issues, fly-ins, the latest technology, ultralight sailplanes, reader feedback and anything else from within the global HG community worthy of coverage.&nbsp; 40316 bytes. en no-spam-please@OzReport.com (Davis Straub) no-spam-please@OzReport.com (Scare!) Copyright 2021 Davis Straub hang gliding 960 2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race https://OzReport.com/toc.php?1624330081 Mon, Jun 21 2021, 8:48:01 pm MDT

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/pilots

Now, forty two pilots have registered for the SCFR including four Swift pilots, thirteen sport class pilots and twenty five open class pilots. To bring out two tugs from Wilotree Park, Jamie says that she needs to have forty two pilots registered and paid.

Thirty one pilots have paid. Eleven pilots haven't paid.

Jamie writes:

Entry Fees: The entry fee for the competition is $275 (does not include tow fees) if paid by August 1st. After August 1st, $375. Entry fees are required in full to complete your registration and to secure your entry.

So we'll probably know by August 1st who is committed to coming to the SCFR. You might also want to make your room reservations.

She also writes:

We will initially accept only 24 pilots and they will be accepted in the order of payment of registration fees. If we fill up with 24 paid participants, additional pilots will only be accepted after we have at least 18 more (for a total of 42) confirmed. Once a total of 42 pilots have registered, we can then accept all 42 and confirm the tugs from Florida once all 42 pilots have paid their registration fees.

Personally I think that there is a bit more flexibility and we could do okay with thirty or so pilots and actually with more than forty two, but those arrangements haven't been finalized yet. It depends, again, on how many pilots commit to coming and the tugs from Wilotree Park will definitely not come out unless forty two have committed.

Discuss "2021 Santa Cruz Flats Race" at the Oz Report forum link»

]]>
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 22:48:01 -0400 Mon, Jun 21 2021, 8:48:01 pm MDT

https://airtribune.com/santa-cruz-flats-race-2021/pilots

Now, forty two pilots have registered for the SCFR including four Swift pilots, thirteen sport class pilots and twenty five open class pilots. To bring out two tugs from Wilotree Park, Jamie says that she needs to have forty two pilots registered and paid.

Thirty one pilots have paid. Eleven pilots haven't paid.

Jamie writes:

Entry Fees: The entry fee for the competition is $275 (does not include tow fees) if paid by August 1st. After August 1st, $375. Entry fees are required in full to complete your registration and to secure your entry.

So we'll probably know by August 1st who is committed to coming to the SCFR. You might also want to make your room reservations.

She also writes:

We will initially accept only 24 pilots and they will be accepted in the order of payment of registration fees. If we fill up with 24 paid participants, additional pilots will only be accepted after we have at least 18 more (for a total of 42) confirmed. Once a total of 42 pilots have registered, we can then accept all 42 and confirm the tugs from Florida once all 42 pilots have paid their registration fees.

Personally I think that there is a bit more flexibility and we could do okay with thirty or so pilots and actually with more than forty two, but those arrangements haven't been finalized yet. It depends, again, on how many pilots commit to coming and the tugs from Wilotree Park will definitely not come out unless forty two have committed.

]]>
New Paragliding World Records https://OzReport.com/toc.php?1624216265 Sun, Jun 20 2021, 1:11:05 pm MDT

Cross Country Magazine writes:

Midsummer magic! We can confirm that Sebastien Kayrouz just broke the paragliding world record in Texas! Still to be ratified, it's 613km on the tracklog, 610km on his vario screen. First 600km by paraglider. Average speed 61.39km/h. It was a tow launch and he was flying an Enzo 3. He also set a hit a declared goal at 557km for a new declared goal world record. Nearly 11 hours in the air. This is the same classic line that Dustin Martin set the hang gliding world record on in 2012. Congratulations Sebastien!

Sebastien started further to the west and north of Zapata, about 320 km north northwest of Zapata, just east of Del Rio. It was the "classic" west Texas line in the sense that he passed just west of San Angelo and just east of Big Spring, east of Lubbock and landed just southeast of Amarillo. The wind was much more south than south southeast, which is the "classic" wind direction.

Track: https://loctome.com/u/sebastienkayrouz/1624114210

3D: https://ayvri.com/scene/ogklqz8e5n/ckq4ky3z000013a6iuab4m5fs

His flight last year, starting here: https://OzReport.com/24.114#2

Like last year a storm in the Gulf.

Claudette yesterday:

Sebastien obviously knows where to go to get record flights. (Earlier version had a photo of another Claudette from years ago. Fooled me.)

His IGC file: https://OzReport.com/data/sebastienkayrouz_2021-06-19T14-50-42Z.igc

Discuss "New Paragliding World Records" at the Oz Report forum link»

]]>
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 15:11:05 -0400 Sun, Jun 20 2021, 1:11:05 pm MDT

Cross Country Magazine writes:

Midsummer magic! We can confirm that Sebastien Kayrouz just broke the paragliding world record in Texas! Still to be ratified, it's 613km on the tracklog, 610km on his vario screen. First 600km by paraglider. Average speed 61.39km/h. It was a tow launch and he was flying an Enzo 3. He also set a hit a declared goal at 557km for a new declared goal world record. Nearly 11 hours in the air. This is the same classic line that Dustin Martin set the hang gliding world record on in 2012. Congratulations Sebastien!

Sebastien started further to the west and north of Zapata, about 320 km north northwest of Zapata, just east of Del Rio. It was the "classic" west Texas line in the sense that he passed just west of San Angelo and just east of Big Spring, east of Lubbock and landed just southeast of Amarillo. The wind was much more south than south southeast, which is the "classic" wind direction.

Track: https://loctome.com/u/sebastienkayrouz/1624114210

3D: https://ayvri.com/scene/ogklqz8e5n/ckq4ky3z000013a6iuab4m5fs

His flight last year, starting here: https://OzReport.com/24.114#2

Like last year a storm in the Gulf.

Claudette yesterday:

Sebastien obviously knows where to go to get record flights. (Earlier version had a photo of another Claudette from years ago. Fooled me.)

His IGC file: https://OzReport.com/data/sebastienkayrouz_2021-06-19T14-50-42Z.igc

]]>
GPS Module fixed https://OzReport.com/toc.php?1624197949 Sun, Jun 20 2021, 8:05:49 am MDT

«Volirium News» sends:

We just released new firmware for the Flytec 6020 and 6030 (aka Bräuniger IQ Competino+ and Compeo+), as well as the Bräuniger IQ Motor+. These versions fix the bug in some of the GPS modules’ software that caused a loss of GPS reception after 1-3 hours. The firmware can be downloaded from here:

If you enjoy the fact that we are keeping your vario alive, donate us a cup of coffee. Thank you!

Download this for the 6030: https://www.volirium.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Flytec6030_5.04a.exe

Discuss "GPS Module fixed" at the Oz Report forum link»

]]>
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 10:05:49 -0400 Sun, Jun 20 2021, 8:05:49 am MDT

«Volirium News» sends:

We just released new firmware for the Flytec 6020 and 6030 (aka Bräuniger IQ Competino+ and Compeo+), as well as the Bräuniger IQ Motor+. These versions fix the bug in some of the GPS modules’ software that caused a loss of GPS reception after 1-3 hours. The firmware can be downloaded from here:

If you enjoy the fact that we are keeping your vario alive, donate us a cup of coffee. Thank you!

Download this for the 6030: https://www.volirium.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Flytec6030_5.04a.exe

]]>
The Highland Challenge Mini Competition 2021, Chestertown, MD https://OzReport.com/toc.php?1624052112 Fri, Jun 18 2021, 3:35:12 pm MDT

«Ric Caylor» writes:

https://ayvri.com/scene/mxkox29wk4/ckq2d9xm500043b6iejoen43r

This was my first competition flying in the open class. It has been an eventful week of flying so far, with a task attempted on seven of the eight possible days. I have been flying my new wing, the Moyes RX 5 Pro LightSpeed. Prior to this time, I had only flown it eight times but with great success. I respect this glider’s high performance but even more, the challenges that may be thrown at me if I am not careful and focused.

The last day of the comp dawned after a day and a half of rainfall which left behind 5+ inches of water. The sky was starting to dry up. Task 6 had ended early for me at the start of the rain period. I had been in the air trying to avoid the rain, but it forced me to the ground because I was not able to escape it; but that’s another story.

On the morning of Task 7 I half set up my glider to dry it out while the sky was still overcast. The ponds and flowing streams of water I had witnessed yesterday were gone. But the wet ground was still soft. Reeds and sediment remained as debris on our airfield. I thought to myself, “If I flew, landing out would be complicated by the mud and swampy areas from the previous day’s deluge”. And that did not excite me on my last day of the competition. Pete Lehmann walked over and said to me “Today is looking like it could be a good day. Charlie has called a task to BALTCH and back.” Reluctantly, I finished assembling my glider and packed my harness for another day of flying above the Eastern Shore.

The field where we cart launch was not too soggy, but pilots needed to be mindful of the path when taking off. I watched as Doug Rogers first took flight to test the air for us. He was staying up and that was a good sign. Adam Elchin, the Dragonfly tug pilot said, it was good, and lift was to be had. Pete was the first of us to start the day, then Jimmy Messina. I was third, followed by John Simon. Knut Ryerson and Ric Niehaus who flew earlier in the comp had other obligations and were not present. Charlie Allen had hurt his shoulder prior to the comp and had flown every day but chose to skip this task. Today was John’s first and only day of flying with us during the mini comp.

On previous days, while on tow most of us were fooled. We would release early, only to struggle to get up. On my second day, I made three tows before successfully finding my way to the goal. Adam towed me towards Jimmy who was circling under a blanket of gray overcast. By the time I made it to his area, lift was light. After a few turns I suddenly spied a mature bald eagle below, climbing. I knew at the point things were going to get better.

We left at nearly the same time at the top of the lift near 3,100’ MSL, which wasn’t quite to cloudbase. An excessively big smile spread across my face as I pulled VG. I led the way out on course line towards the BALTCT waypoint which was 18.3Km from the start circle perimeter. The task for today was an out and back to Bens for a total of 36.3 Km. All week Jimmy was the dominator, winning every day except for one. Today I wanted to win.

Currently, I was a bit higher, and leading. Excitement coursed through my veins racing with Jimmy. I kept my lead for two more climbs and, reaching the turn point first, I quickly tagged it and turned back towards goal at Ben’s. Having a light tailwind was my advantage. I expected to find Jimmy still climbing, which would have been to my advantage, putting me further in the lead, but he had disappeared! I had burned up much of my altitude by this point and I needed another climb.

I started looking for ground sources, thermal generators and triggers. There was a large chicken farm on the other side of a small, forested area with large dark fields adjacent to it. “There were birds, lots of birds,” I exclaimed to myself. By the time I got there I found myself at 590’ MSL which meant I was less than 500’ AGL. I unzipped my harness in case I needed to land but I was determined not to land. There was a large field under me above which I could scratch as much as I needed in order to save my flight and stay in the air. The lift was small, strong and punchy. I would fly into the core and then push out and whip into the turn again and again. With each attempt I managed to climb a little bit more. I would constantly check my altitude numbers on my Blade flight instrument. I gained twenty feet, fifteen feet, thirty feet as I watched the ground get further away. Finally, at about 1,000 feet I could make a complete circle in lift.

Charlie and Doug were the retrieval drivers and had been following us on the ground and they were parked close by, watching me scratch my way out of my predicament. Charlie coached me into a better climb rate over the radio. Finally, I could relax some and look around for Jimmy who was off in the distance climbing back at the turn point. I radioed him, hoping he would leave his climb and join me. He did, and I started to smile once again.

The tables started turning, in favor of Jimmy, but I was still in the race. Pete and John had landed just outside of the start circle. I knew at that point I had at least second place even if I did not make goal. However, making goal could improve my overall standings in the comp. Yes, I was thinking about that too.

While I was able to climb back to nearly cloud base, I struggled to out climb or top Jimmy. He now had the upper hand, and he was not going to give it up without a fight. Jimmy started pulling away from me and advanced to the next thermal which dramatically increased his lead. It basically took three climbs to get to the turn point, and three more to get home (goal). Cloud base was only around 3,500’.

Jimmy topped out the last climb before he relayed over our 2-meter HAM frequency that he had the glide numbers and that he was proceeding to goal. Meanwhile I was near 2,000’ halfway back, scratching and praying that I could core this climb and inch my way closer to goal. Suddenly, the angels sang while a redtail hawk came from nowhere and began circling below me. “Yes!” All I needed was one more thermal after this gas up, and I knew where to find it.

Mike Barber says that when you’re circling in zero lift you are waiting for the bus to pick you up. And after gliding from my last climb, I found myself waiting for the bus. I just hoped that I wasn’t too late. I was now so close to victory. I really needed to focus. As John Simon says, “Be patient, shift gears and slow down.” It is one thing to know and yet another thing to do. So many times, in other comps I would leave an area hoping to find something better. Not this time! No, I am going to make it home. I kept telling myself over and over. My focus was on two things: finding a climb and watching my arrival altitude at goal. I was just over 5k away with a slight tailwind. There was no need to squeak it in. I kept watching as I gained height and increased my arrival altitude. It had gone from -230ft to 1200ft! That was way more than I needed but there was no room for uncertainty.

By this time Jimmy had arrived at goal. He told me that the wind direction had changed to SE back at the field. I buried the base bar and headed home. Yes, that smile came back once again. This would be my third day of making goal out of six flights. Making goal on the last day is like icing on the cake. I arrived at 600’ AGL and eager to land. With the help of Jimmy from the air and John on the ground they coached me with wind direction in the field. After flying for 2 hours and 2 minutes I landed on my feet and carried my glider 50 yards back to the hanger. My approach had been a bit low and slow when I turned from base to final such that I needed to change my spot. John reminded me that after a long flight one should remember to “not get sloppy.” You need to focus even more because you are exhausted, emotional, and easily distracted. I owned my mistake and I got away with it this time, but I will not let it happen again.

I cannot say enough about my gratitude to have been a part of this Highland Challenge Mini Comp., to fly with the “Big Dogs” who have a tremendous number of hours and years under their wings, it is humbling and yet an honor to have flown with them. I appreciate their wisdom, mentoring and encouragement. For me, the opportunity to finally get off the porch was a long time coming. The lessons I have learned and put into practice are starting to gel, but I know that I have only just begun my journey. I’ll finish with one of my favorite quotes, "Success is not final; failure is not fatal. It is only the courage to continue that counts." - Winston Churchill

Discuss "The Highland Challenge Mini Competition 2021, Chestertown, MD" at the Oz Report forum link»

]]>
Fri, 18 Jun 2021 17:35:12 -0400 Fri, Jun 18 2021, 3:35:12 pm MDT

«Ric Caylor» writes:

https://ayvri.com/scene/mxkox29wk4/ckq2d9xm500043b6iejoen43r

This was my first competition flying in the open class. It has been an eventful week of flying so far, with a task attempted on seven of the eight possible days. I have been flying my new wing, the Moyes RX 5 Pro LightSpeed. Prior to this time, I had only flown it eight times but with great success. I respect this glider’s high performance but even more, the challenges that may be thrown at me if I am not careful and focused.

The last day of the comp dawned after a day and a half of rainfall which left behind 5+ inches of water. The sky was starting to dry up. Task 6 had ended early for me at the start of the rain period. I had been in the air trying to avoid the rain, but it forced me to the ground because I was not able to escape it; but that’s another story.

On the morning of Task 7 I half set up my glider to dry it out while the sky was still overcast. The ponds and flowing streams of water I had witnessed yesterday were gone. But the wet ground was still soft. Reeds and sediment remained as debris on our airfield. I thought to myself, “If I flew, landing out would be complicated by the mud and swampy areas from the previous day’s deluge”. And that did not excite me on my last day of the competition. Pete Lehmann walked over and said to me “Today is looking like it could be a good day. Charlie has called a task to BALTCH and back.” Reluctantly, I finished assembling my glider and packed my harness for another day of flying above the Eastern Shore.

The field where we cart launch was not too soggy, but pilots needed to be mindful of the path when taking off. I watched as Doug Rogers first took flight to test the air for us. He was staying up and that was a good sign. Adam Elchin, the Dragonfly tug pilot said, it was good, and lift was to be had. Pete was the first of us to start the day, then Jimmy Messina. I was third, followed by John Simon. Knut Ryerson and Ric Niehaus who flew earlier in the comp had other obligations and were not present. Charlie Allen had hurt his shoulder prior to the comp and had flown every day but chose to skip this task. Today was John’s first and only day of flying with us during the mini comp.

On previous days, while on tow most of us were fooled. We would release early, only to struggle to get up. On my second day, I made three tows before successfully finding my way to the goal. Adam towed me towards Jimmy who was circling under a blanket of gray overcast. By the time I made it to his area, lift was light. After a few turns I suddenly spied a mature bald eagle below, climbing. I knew at the point things were going to get better.

We left at nearly the same time at the top of the lift near 3,100’ MSL, which wasn’t quite to cloudbase. An excessively big smile spread across my face as I pulled VG. I led the way out on course line towards the BALTCT waypoint which was 18.3Km from the start circle perimeter. The task for today was an out and back to Bens for a total of 36.3 Km. All week Jimmy was the dominator, winning every day except for one. Today I wanted to win.

Currently, I was a bit higher, and leading. Excitement coursed through my veins racing with Jimmy. I kept my lead for two more climbs and, reaching the turn point first, I quickly tagged it and turned back towards goal at Ben’s. Having a light tailwind was my advantage. I expected to find Jimmy still climbing, which would have been to my advantage, putting me further in the lead, but he had disappeared! I had burned up much of my altitude by this point and I needed another climb.

I started looking for ground sources, thermal generators and triggers. There was a large chicken farm on the other side of a small, forested area with large dark fields adjacent to it. “There were birds, lots of birds,” I exclaimed to myself. By the time I got there I found myself at 590’ MSL which meant I was less than 500’ AGL. I unzipped my harness in case I needed to land but I was determined not to land. There was a large field under me above which I could scratch as much as I needed in order to save my flight and stay in the air. The lift was small, strong and punchy. I would fly into the core and then push out and whip into the turn again and again. With each attempt I managed to climb a little bit more. I would constantly check my altitude numbers on my Blade flight instrument. I gained twenty feet, fifteen feet, thirty feet as I watched the ground get further away. Finally, at about 1,000 feet I could make a complete circle in lift.

Charlie and Doug were the retrieval drivers and had been following us on the ground and they were parked close by, watching me scratch my way out of my predicament. Charlie coached me into a better climb rate over the radio. Finally, I could relax some and look around for Jimmy who was off in the distance climbing back at the turn point. I radioed him, hoping he would leave his climb and join me. He did, and I started to smile once again.

The tables started turning, in favor of Jimmy, but I was still in the race. Pete and John had landed just outside of the start circle. I knew at that point I had at least second place even if I did not make goal. However, making goal could improve my overall standings in the comp. Yes, I was thinking about that too.

While I was able to climb back to nearly cloud base, I struggled to out climb or top Jimmy. He now had the upper hand, and he was not going to give it up without a fight. Jimmy started pulling away from me and advanced to the next thermal which dramatically increased his lead. It basically took three climbs to get to the turn point, and three more to get home (goal). Cloud base was only around 3,500’.

Jimmy topped out the last climb before he relayed over our 2-meter HAM frequency that he had the glide numbers and that he was proceeding to goal. Meanwhile I was near 2,000’ halfway back, scratching and praying that I could core this climb and inch my way closer to goal. Suddenly, the angels sang while a redtail hawk came from nowhere and began circling below me. “Yes!” All I needed was one more thermal after this gas up, and I knew where to find it.

Mike Barber says that when you’re circling in zero lift you are waiting for the bus to pick you up. And after gliding from my last climb, I found myself waiting for the bus. I just hoped that I wasn’t too late. I was now so close to victory. I really needed to focus. As John Simon says, “Be patient, shift gears and slow down.” It is one thing to know and yet another thing to do. So many times, in other comps I would leave an area hoping to find something better. Not this time! No, I am going to make it home. I kept telling myself over and over. My focus was on two things: finding a climb and watching my arrival altitude at goal. I was just over 5k away with a slight tailwind. There was no need to squeak it in. I kept watching as I gained height and increased my arrival altitude. It had gone from -230ft to 1200ft! That was way more than I needed but there was no room for uncertainty.

By this time Jimmy had arrived at goal. He told me that the wind direction had changed to SE back at the field. I buried the base bar and headed home. Yes, that smile came back once again. This would be my third day of making goal out of six flights. Making goal on the last day is like icing on the cake. I arrived at 600’ AGL and eager to land. With the help of Jimmy from the air and John on the ground they coached me with wind direction in the field. After flying for 2 hours and 2 minutes I landed on my feet and carried my glider 50 yards back to the hanger. My approach had been a bit low and slow when I turned from base to final such that I needed to change my spot. John reminded me that after a long flight one should remember to “not get sloppy.” You need to focus even more because you are exhausted, emotional, and easily distracted. I owned my mistake and I got away with it this time, but I will not let it happen again.

I cannot say enough about my gratitude to have been a part of this Highland Challenge Mini Comp., to fly with the “Big Dogs” who have a tremendous number of hours and years under their wings, it is humbling and yet an honor to have flown with them. I appreciate their wisdom, mentoring and encouragement. For me, the opportunity to finally get off the porch was a long time coming. The lessons I have learned and put into practice are starting to gel, but I know that I have only just begun my journey. I’ll finish with one of my favorite quotes, "Success is not final; failure is not fatal. It is only the courage to continue that counts." - Winston Churchill

]]>
Open Annecy 2021 - French & Czech Championship https://OzReport.com/toc.php?1623984849 Thu, Jun 17 2021, 8:54:09 pm MDT

Pictures: https://championnatdefrancedelta2021.blogspot.com/?m=1

https://airtribune.com/open-annecy-2021/results

Task 5:

# Name Glider Time Total
1 Benedikt Braun Aeros Combat 12.7 C 03:30:30 997.4
2 Mario Alonzi Aeros Combat 12.7 C 03:43:07 932.4
3 Lorenzo De Grandis Icaro z9 03:52:13 893.6
4 Dan Vyhnalik Aeros Combat 12.7 C 03:52:42 891.9
5 Davide Guiducci Icaro 2000 Laminar 13.2 03:53:19 877.3
6 Laurent Thevenot Aeros Combat gt 13.5 03:53:19 872.3
7 Gregoire David Icaro 2000 Laminar Z9 03:53:37 865.3
8 Jiri Gut Wills Wing T2C 04:15:41 777.8
9 Petr Cejka Aeros Combat 04:32:34 722.6
10 Jean-Marc Rousselet Wills Wing T3 04:41:59 689.2

Cumulative:

# Name Glider Total
1 Mario Alonzi Aeros Combat 12.7 C 4750
2 Dan Vyhnalik Aeros Combat 12.7 C 4716
3 Christian Ciech Icaro 2000 Laminar 4359
4 Manuel Revelli Icaro Laminar 4218
5 Lorenzo De Grandis Icaro z9 4190
6 Laurent Thevenot Aeros Combat gt 13.5 4141
7 Gregoire David Icaro 2000 Laminar Z9 4036
8 Davide Guiducci Icaro 2000 Laminar 13.2 3865
9 Francois Isoard Aeros combat GT 12,7 3845
10 Benedikt Braun Aeros Combat 12.7 C 3455

Discuss "Open Annecy 2021 - French & Czech Championship" at the Oz Report forum link»

]]>
Thu, 17 Jun 2021 22:54:09 -0400 Thu, Jun 17 2021, 8:54:09 pm MDT

Pictures: https://championnatdefrancedelta2021.blogspot.com/?m=1

https://airtribune.com/open-annecy-2021/results

Task 5:

# Name Glider Time Total
1 Benedikt Braun Aeros Combat 12.7 C 03:30:30 997.4
2 Mario Alonzi Aeros Combat 12.7 C 03:43:07 932.4
3 Lorenzo De Grandis Icaro z9 03:52:13 893.6
4 Dan Vyhnalik Aeros Combat 12.7 C 03:52:42 891.9
5 Davide Guiducci Icaro 2000 Laminar 13.2 03:53:19 877.3
6 Laurent Thevenot Aeros Combat gt 13.5 03:53:19 872.3
7 Gregoire David Icaro 2000 Laminar Z9 03:53:37 865.3
8 Jiri Gut Wills Wing T2C 04:15:41 777.8
9 Petr Cejka Aeros Combat 04:32:34 722.6
10 Jean-Marc Rousselet Wills Wing T3 04:41:59 689.2

Cumulative:

# Name Glider Total
1 Mario Alonzi Aeros Combat 12.7 C 4750
2 Dan Vyhnalik Aeros Combat 12.7 C 4716
3 Christian Ciech Icaro 2000 Laminar 4359
4 Manuel Revelli Icaro Laminar 4218
5 Lorenzo De Grandis Icaro z9 4190
6 Laurent Thevenot Aeros Combat gt 13.5 4141
7 Gregoire David Icaro 2000 Laminar Z9 4036
8 Davide Guiducci Icaro 2000 Laminar 13.2 3865
9 Francois Isoard Aeros combat GT 12,7 3845
10 Benedikt Braun Aeros Combat 12.7 C 3455
]]>